Greek-Australian Scientist Publishes Study Highlighting Exercises That Can Save Your Life

heart attack

According to international research headed by Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis, a Greek-Australian scientist at Sydney University, tennis, swimming and aerobics are the three best sports for health. On the contrary, he notes, football and jogging are less beneficial and do not keep away the possibility of early death.

Details on his research were recently published in the British magazine British Journal of Sports Medicine and was compiled of analyzed data from over 80,300 people with an average age of 52. The study monitored the participants for nine years during which 8,790 died from several different reasons.

The study showed that the danger of death from health related causes decreased 47 percent in the group of individuals who engaged in playing tennis, squash or badminton and that tennis in particular reduces the chances of death from a cardiac disease by 56 percent.

Those individuals who opt to swim can expect a 28 percent decrease in dying from health related causes, which is similar to what individuals who participate in aerobics can expect as the study showed a 46 percent decrease.

Professor Stamatakis is a graduate from the Sports Science School of the University of Thessaloniki, which he completed in 1995. In 2002 he attended Bristol University where he completed his Ph.D, followed by teaching at the Epidemiology and Public Health Department of London University College. In 2013 he became a Professor at the University of Sydney, where he still teaches today.

Source: ANA-MPA

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