Starpharma to develop improved cancer drug

Source: News

BIOTECH Starpharma Holdings says it has improved a blockbuster drug that is mainly used to treat colon and colorectal cancer.

Starpharma has conducted a pre-clinical study of the effects of a dendrimer-enhanced nanoparticle version of the drug oxaliplatin on colon cancer.

The results showed that the enhanced drug was better at inhibiting tumours and reducing toxic side-effects than the non-enhanced drug.

Oxaliplatin is sold as Eloxatin by Sanofi and in 2012 generated sales of about $US2 billion (currently around $A2.16 billion).

“These positive results achieved with Starpharma’s dendrimer-enhanced oxaliplatin nanoparticles are the subject of a new patent filing and given the obvious commercial potential, Starpharma now intends to advance dendrimer-enhanced oxaliplatin formulations into development,” the company said in a statement on Wednesday.

Dendrimers are a type of synthetic nanoscale polymer that is highly regular in size and structure and suited to pharmaceutical uses.

Shares in Starpharma were 1.5 cents lower at 98.5 cents at 1253 AEST.

Russians elected to Cyprus bank board

Source: News

SHAREHOLDERS of Cyprus’ largest bank have elected six Russians to sit on its new, 16-member board of directors, a consequence of the country’s bailout agreement with international creditors.

The vote puts more foreign nationals on the board of the Bank of Cyprus than ever before.

The fact that they are all Russians – one of whom, Vladimir Strzhalkovskiy, was elected by other board members as vice chairman – reflects the large stake they had in Cyprus’ banking system.

Russians kept billions in Cypriot bank accounts because of benefits such as low taxes and high interest rates, helping to swell the size of the financial sector at its peak to eight times the country’s entire economy.

Cyprus turned for help to its euro area partners and the International Monetary Fund in June, 2012, to rescue its Greece-exposed banks and to stave off bankruptcy. But Cyprus’ creditors sought a fundamental restructuring of the country’s financial system which they saw as unsustainable.

According to the terms of Cyprus’ rescue deal it agreed in March, depositors with more than 100,000 euros in the Bank of Cyprus, and the second-largest lender Laiki, were forced to take huge losses on their savings in order for the country to qualify for a 10 billion euros ($A14.35 billion) loan.

Money from the deposit grab – or ‘haircut’ – was used to replenish Bank of Cyprus’ capital buffers, while Laiki ceased to operate and large chunks of it were absorbed by the larger lender.

The haircut sapped trust in Cypriot banks, prompting authorities to impose restrictions on money transfers and withdrawals to prevent a run. Many restrictions have since been relaxed, but officials say it may take many months before they’re fully lifted.

Some 47.5 per cent of uninsured deposits in the Bank of Cyprus were converted into shares, turning large Russian depositors into big shareholders requiring representation on the board.

The Russian board members include Igor Lojevsky, who has worked at both the World Bank and Germany’s Deutsche Bank. The board also elected Cypriot Christis Hassapis as its chairman.

Some 3.500 shareholders attended the banks’ annual general meeting either in person or by proxy, representing 53.6 per cent of the total share capital.

The meeting was a tumultuous affair as several old shareholders – who saw almost all of the value of their shares slashed under the bailout’s conditions – loudly opposed the proceedings because they hadn’t received the banks’ post-bailout financial results. Some stormed out of the meeting, saying that they were being asked to legitimise “illegal” decisions made without their consent.

The new board replaces an interim one which had been tasked with stabilising the bank in the bailout’s aftermath and starting to downsize it after absorbing Laiki’s operations. The bank still faces significant challenges, including how to deal with non-performing loans and restoring trust.

“Our goal is to fully restore faith in the banking system and to return to a trajectory of growth,” the new board said in a statement.

COMMON GREEK EXPRESSIONS

Greeks talking Common Sayings in Greece (in Greek)

If you grew up in Greek household, chances are you’ve heard your fair share of golden one-liners from your father, mother, papou, yiayia, and especially your crazy uncle or aunt. At a young age you probably wondered what in the heck they meant by some of the things they said, but at the end of the day you always somehow got the message.

Throughout the years these expressions have been shared over message boards and forums on the internet, and exchanged between people in everyday discussions. But we here at Greek Gateway have finally decided to set the record straight by providing you with an up-to-date organized list of some of the best expressions used in every day Greek dialogue. Along with each saying we have also provided you with a literal English translation, as well as an explanation for what the Greeks really mean when using these terminologies.

I hope you enjoy this reading this compilation as much as I enjoyed piecing it together.

Let us begin…
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Greek Saying #1: “Τα μάτια σου δεκατέσσερα.”
Literal English Translation: “Your eyes fourteen.”
What the Greeks really mean: “Keep your eyes open at all times.”

Greek Saying #2: “Όποιος βιάζεται σκοντάφτει.”
Literal English Translation: “Whoever hurries stumbles.”
What the Greeks really mean: “He who doesn’t think things through, stumbles in the end.”

Greek Saying #3: “Η ζωή είναι σαν ένα αγγούρι, ο έναs το τρώει και δροσιστείτε, και ο άλλος το τρώει και ζορίζετε.”
Literal English Translation: “Life is like a cucumber, one person eats it and is refreshed, and another person eats it and struggles.”
What the Greeks really mean: “Life is simply what you make of it.”

Greek Saying #4: “Kσεκωλιάστικα.”
Literal English Translation: “Un-assed.” (Yes, we are fully aware that un-assed is not a real English word).
What the Greeks really mean: “I have over-exerted myself.” (I know what you’re thinking. Don’t even go there).

Greek Saying #5: “θα σοu αλλάξω τα φώτα.”
Literal English Translation: “I will change your lights.”
What the Greeks really mean: “I will surprise you in a way you never thought imaginable.”

Greek Saying #6: “πνίγεσε σ’ένα κουτάλι νερό.”
Literal English Translation: “You drown in a spoon of water.”
What the Greeks really mean: “You make even the simplest of tasks seem so difficult.”

Greek Saying #7: “Θα φάs ξύλο.”
Literal English Translation: “You’re going to eat wood.”
What the Greeks really mean: “You’re going to get a beating!”

Greek Saying #8: “Ο διαβολος δεν ειχε δουλεια και εκατσε και γαμισαι τα παιδια του.”
Literal English Translation: “Τhe devil had nothing to do, so he screwed his kids.”
What the Greeks really mean: “He/she has nothing better to do”.

Greek Saying #9: “θα σου χέσω το γάιδαρο.”
Literal English Translation: “I will shit your donkey.”
What the Greeks really mean: This phrase is used as a threat when you’re really angry with someone.

Greek Saying #10: “θα σου πιω το αίμα.”
Literal English Translation: “I’m going to drink your blood.”
What the Greeks really mean: This phrase is also used as a threat when you’re really angry with someone. That’s right. The Greeks are crazy blood-sucking S.O.B’s.

Greek Saying #11: “Θα μου κλάσεις τα αρχίδια.”
Literal English Translation: “You’ll fart on my testicles.”
What the Greeks really mean: “You can’t do anything about it.”

Greek Saying #12: “Τα πολλά λόγια είναι φτωχια.”
Literal English Translation: “The many words are poor.”
What the Greeks really mean: “Talk is cheap.”

Greek Saying #13: “Tο εχουν παραχέσει.”
Literal English Translation: “They have overshitted it.” (Again, yes, we are fully aware that overshitted is not a real English word).
What the Greeks really mean: “They have overdone it.”

Greek Saying #14: “θα σου βάλω τα δυο πόδια σε ενα παπουτσι.”
Literal English Translation: “I will put your two feet in one shoe.”
What the Greeks really mean: “I will put you in your place.”

Greek Saying #15: “Σηκωθήκαν τα πόδια να βαρέσουν το κεφάλι.”
Literal English Translation: “The feet got up to hit the head.”
What the Greeks really mean: “I’m onto you.”

Greek Saying #16: “Αν η γιαγιά μου είχε αρχίδια, θα τη φώναζα παππού.”
Literal English Translation: “If my grandmother had balls, I would call her my grandfather.”
What the Greeks really mean: “The entire situation changes once you start throwing ‘ifs’ into the scenario.”

Greek Saying #17: “Δεν ειναι Γιάννης, ειναι Γιανάκης.”
Literal English Translation: “It’s not John, it’s Johnny.”
What the Greeks really mean: “It’s one and the same.” Like saying “po-tay-toe, po-tah-toe” in English!

Greek Saying #18: “Έφαγα τον κόσμο να σε βρω.”
Literal English Translation: “I ate the whole world to find you.”
What the Greeks really mean: Just an exaggerated way of saying “I tore this place apart looking for you.”

Greek Saying #19: “Να μου τρυπήσεις τη μύτη!”
Literal English Translation: “Pierce my nose!”
What the Greeks really mean: This phrase is usually used in the context of a discussion where you’re so sure about something that you’re willing to “pierce your nose” if you’re wrong.

Greek Saying #20: “Χεστικαι η κοντη!”
Literal English Translation: “The short woman shit herself!”
What the Greeks really mean: “Big deal!”

Greek Saying #21: “Skata sta freidia sou.”
Literal English Translation: “Shit to your eyebrows.”
What the Greeks really mean: “Quit being such a pretentious asshole.”

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Ekei pou eimai da eisai mia mera – Where I am you will be one day

koufalitsa – small hole in a tree – crafty/cunning person

ade kourepsou – go have a haircut – stop talking about things you’re oblivious about

tha se fao – I’m gonna eat you – I’m really angry for what you did

Tha sou alakso ta fota– I’ll change your lights – You’re screwed.

Tha fas ksilo – You’ll eat wood – You’ll get a smack.

Siga ta Laxana – slowly the vegetables – It’s not a big deal.

Tha mou tripiseis tin miti – You will pierce my nose – You can’t do anything to me.

Tha mou klasis ta frithia – You can fart on my eyebrows – You can’t do anything to me.

Ai Pkniksou – go drown yourself – leave me alone

kolopedo – bum child – misbehaved child and/or bastard

min mou zalizeis ta arxithia – don’t make my balls dizzy – Stop saying nonsense to me.

Pao na kano ton psofio – I’m going to act like a corpse – I’m going to have a rest.

Kane ton psofio korio – I’m going to act like a dead bug. – I’m going to pretend that nothing happened.

se grafo sta palia mou ta papoutsia – I am writing you on my old shoes – I’m ignoring you.

“Den imaste kala”…(We are not well!)

“Tha fas ksilo”…(You will eat stcks!)

“Boutses Ble”…(Blue Dicks!)

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ARE YOU WORKING ME ? —>>ΜΕ ΔΟΥΛΕΥΕΙΣ ?

ARE WE GLUING COFFEE POTS ? —>>ΜΠΡΙΚΙΑ ΚΟΛΛΑΜΕ ?

AT THE END THEY SHAVE THE GROOM —>>ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΞΥΡΙΖΟΥΝ ΤΟΝ ΓΑΜΠΡΟ

CATCH THE EGG AND MOW IT —>> ΠΙΑΣ’ ΤΟ ΑΥΓΟ ΚΑΙ ΚΟΥΡΕΦ’ ΤΟ

I HAVE SPIT THEM —>> ΤΑ ‘ΧΩ ΦΤΥΣΕΙ

FART US A STONEWALL ! —>>ΚΛΑΣΕ ΜΑΣ ΜΙΑ ΜΑΝΤΡΑ !

HAIRS CURLY—>>ΤΡΙΧΕΣ ΚΑΤΣΑΡΕΣ

HE MADE US THE THREE TWO—>>ΜΑΣ ΕΚΑΝΕ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ ΔΥΟ

I TOOK THEM TO THE SKULL—>>ΤΑ ΠΗΡΑ ΣΤΟ ΚΡΑΝΙΟ

I AM DOGBORED—>>ΣΚΥΛΟΒΑΡΙΕΜΑΙ

I TOOK MY THREE—>>ΠΗΡΑ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ ΜΟΥ

SHIT AND FROMSHIT—>>ΣΚΑΤΑ ΚΑΙ ΑΠΟΣΚΑΤΑ

WE DRANK HIM—>>ΤOΝ ΗΠΙΑΜΕ

YOUR MIND AND A POUND AND THE PAINTER’S BRUSH—>>ΤΟ ΜΥΑΛΟ ΣΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΛΥΡΑ ΚΑΙ ΤΟΥ ΜΠΟΓΙΑΤΖΗ Ο ΚΟΠΑΝΟΣ

I SAW THE CHRIST SOLDIER—>>ΕΙΔΑ ΤΟ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ ΦΑΝΤΑΡΟ

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Are you working me? (Με δουλεύεις?)

You changed my lights (Μου άλλαξες τα φώτα)

I | He/She/It | We |You | They did her from hand (Την έκαναν από χέρι)

Welcome my eyes the two (Καλώς τα μάτια μου τα δυό)

Fart me a stonewall of bullocks! (Κλάσε μου μιά μάντρα p00tα)

He is a fart bathtub (είναι κλασομπανιέρας)

Better five and in hand than ten and waiting (Κάλιο 5 και στο χέρι παρα 10 και καρτέρι)

Better donkey-bonding than donkey-searching (Κάλιο γαϊδουρόδενε παρά γαϊδουρογύρευε)

It says! (Λέει)

It counts (Μετράει)

I’ve played them! (Τα έχω παίξει)

I made her lottery! (Την εκανα λαχείο)

I stayed bone! (Εμεινα κόκκαλο)

I saw the Christ soldier. (Είδα τον Χριστό φαντάρο)

It happened the come to see. (Εγινε το έλα να δείς)

Like the unfair curse. (Σαν την άδικη κατάρα)

Something’s running down to the gypsies. (κάτι τρέχει στα γύφτικα)

It didn’t sit on us.(Δεν μας έκατσε)

He gives her to me. (Μου την δίνει)

You take him and you incline (Τον πέρνεις και γέρνεις)

It brakes her to me. (Μου την σπάει)

You owe me your horns. (Μου χρωστά τα κέρατα του)

Who pays the bride. (Ποιός πληρώνει την νύφη?)

He doesn’t understand Christ. (Δεν καταλαβαίνει Χριστό!)

Your mind and a pound and the painter’s brush. (Τα μυαλά σου και μιά λύρα και του μπογιατζή ο κόπανος)

I came out of my clothes. (Βγήκα από τα ρούχα μου)

This place is at Devil’s mother. (Αυτό είναι στου διαόλου την μάνα)

It rains chair legs. (Βρέχει καρεκλοπόδαρα)

Hairs curly. (τρίχες κατσαρές)

I don’t have face to come out in society. (Δεν έχω πρόσωπο να αντικρίσω την κοινωνία)

How from here morning morning? (Πώς από δώ πρωϊ πρωϊ?)

I don’t know my blindness. (Δεν ξέρω την τύφλα μου)

The Blind man’s rights (του στραβού το δίκιο)

I see it pale. (Τα βλέπω χλωμά)

Ηe is dewatered! (Αυτός είναι ξενέρωτος)

You are for the festivals. (Είσαι για τα πανηγύρια)

Three-blanket party. (Τρικούβερτο γλέντι)

They don’t chew. (Δεν μασάνε)

Does the goat chew taramas? (Μασάει η κατσίκα ταραμά?

Does the cat spins in the yoghurt? (Σπινιαρει η γατα στο γιαουρτι)

Slow the cabbages! (Σιγά τα λάχανα)

Sit down well. (κάτσε καλά)

Catch the egg and give it a haircut. (Πιάσε το αυγό και κούρευτο!!)

Are we gluing coffee pots? (Μπρίκια κολλάμε?)

Marrows drums! (Κολοκύθια τούμπανα)

Marrows with oregano. (Κολοκύθια με τη ρίγανη)

I made them salad – I made them sea. (Τα έκανα σαλάτα/ θάλασσα)

We became robes – Robe unbuttoned! (Γίναμε ρόμπες)

I have spit them. (Τά έφτυσα)

He ate bunch. (Εφαγε μπουκέτο)

I throw you to the ears. ( Σου ρίχνω στ’ αυτιά)

I took them to the scul (Τα πήρα στό κρανίο)

Slow the very oil (σιγά τον πολυέλαιο)

Holy Mary’s eyes. (Της Παναγιάς τα μάτια)

Whatever you remember you are glad. (¨Οτι θυμάσαι χαίρεσαι)

Are you asking and the change from over? (Μου ζητάς και τα ρέστα?)

Glass! (Τζάμι!!)

We drank him. (Τον ήπιαμε)

We confused our thighs. (Μπερδέψαμε τα μπούτια μας)

He farted me fat. (Μέ έκλασε χοντρά)

Ηore’s fence. ( Πουτάνας το κάγκελο)

Of the gay. (Του p00t)

She’s taking him. (Τόν παίρνει)

The bad your weather! (Τον κακό σου τον καιρό)

With this side to sleep. (Αυτό το πλευρό να κοιμάσαι)

Your eye the crosseyed! (Το μάτι σου το αλλήθωρο)

I am dogbored. (Σκυλοβαριέμαι)

We did black eyes to see you (Μαυρα μάτια να σε δούμε)

Like the snooooows! (Σαν τα χιόνια)

He made us the three two. (Μας έκανε τα τρία δύο)

I took the third the longest. (Πήρα τό τρίτο το μακρυτερο)

You are a coffee shop. (Είσαι καφενείο)

Shit and fromshit. (Σκατά και απόσκατα)

At the end they shave the groom. (Στο τέλος ξυρίζουν τον γαμπρό)

Sunday short feast. (Κυριακή κοντή γιορτή)

To say the figs figs and the tub tub! (Τα σύκα σύκα και η σκάφη σκάφη)

You do accounts without the hotel owner. (Λογαριάζεις χωρίς τον ξενοδόχο)

The madness doesn’t go to the mountains. (Η τρέλα δεν πάει στα βουνά)

Better your eye goes out than your name. (Καλύτερα να σου βγεί το μάτι παρά το όνομα)

Will I take out the snake from the hole? (Θα βγάλω το φίδι από την τρύπα?)

He sleeps with the hens. (κοιμάται με τις κότες)

He stuck me to the wall. (Με κόλησε στον τοίχο)

I’m sitting on ignited coals. (κάθομαι σε αναμμένα κάρβουνα)

You will eat wood. (Θα φάς ξύλο)

In the boil the iron sticks (στην βράση κολλάει το σίδερο)

They returned me the entrails. (Μου έβγαλε τα σωθικά)

He sat me on the neck. (Μου έκατσε στό σβέρκο)

I balded! – You balded me! (Καράφλιασα – Με καράφλιασες)

If … this happens pierce my nose! (Να μου τρυπήσεις την μύτη)

You took my ears with the music. (Μου πήρες τα αυτιά με την μουσική)

Has the weather turnings. (Εχει ο καιρός γυρίσματα)

I | He/She/It | We |You | They do(es) the duck. (Κάνει την πάπια)

In the down down of the written. (Στο κάτω κάτω της γραφής)

He does the dead bug. (Κάνει τον ψόφιο κοριό)

We dicked it (Την πουτσίσαμε)

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ΚΑΝΕΙ ΤΗΝ ΠΑΠΙΑ.
HE DOES THE DUCK.
He’s playing dumb

ΜΕ ΔΟΥΛΕΥΕΙΣ?
ARE YOU WORKING ME?
Are you having me on?

ΜΠΡΙΚΙΑ ΚΟΛΛΑΜΕ?
ARE WE GLUING COFFEE POTS?
What kind of work do you think I do? (when someone is under the impression that your job isn’t worth much)

ΖΗΤΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΑ ΡΕΣΤΑ ΑΠΟ ΠΑΝΩ?
ARE YOU ASKING AND THE CHANGE ON TOP?
Do you want more on top? (as in, you’ve done quite a bit for someone but they still want more, they want the change (ρέστα) as well)

ΚΑΛΛΙΟ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ ΣΤΟ ΧΕΡΙ ΠΑΡΑ ΔΕΚΑ ΚΑΙ ΚΑΡΤΕΡΕΙ.
BETTER FIVE AND IN HAND THAN TEN AND WAITING.
A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.

ΚΑΛΛΙΟ ΓΑΙΔΟΥΡΟΔΕΝΕ ΠΑΡΑ ΓΑΙΔΟΥΡΟΓΥΡΕΥΕ.
BETTER DONKEY – BONDING THAN DONKEY – SEARCHING.
Better safe than sorry

ΠΙΑΣ’ΤΟ ΑΥΓΟ ΚΑΙ ΚΟΥΡΕΦ’ΤΟ.
CATCH THE EGG AND SHAVE IT.
When somebody asks you to do something that’s not possible (like shaving an egg)

ΔΕΝ ΜΑΣΑΝΕ.
THEY DON’T CHEW.
They’re not buying it (i.e they don’t believe the story)

ΔΕΝ ΚΑΤΑΛΑΒΑΙΝΕΙ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ.
HE DOESN’T UNDERSTAND CHRIST.
There’s no talking to him (he won’t listen)

ΤΡΙΧΕΣ ΚΑΤΣΑΡΕΣ.
HAIRS CURLY.
Stuff and nonesense.. (or “poppycock”)

ΠΩΣ ΑΠΟ ΕΔΩ ΠΡΩΙ ΠΡΩΙ?
HOW FROM HERE MORNING MORNING?

ΣΑΝ ΤΑ ΧΙΟΟΟΝΙΑ.
LIKE THE SNOOOWS!
Long time no see!

ΤΗΣ ΠΟΥΤΑΝΑΣ ΤΟ ΚΑΓΚΕΛΟ.
WHORE’S BANISTER.
A bloody mess

ΕΦΑΓΕ ΠΟΡΤΑ.
HE ATE DOOR.
He was turned down flat

ΚΟΙΜΑΤΑΙ ΜΕ ΤΙΣ ΚΟΤΕΣ.
HE SLEEPS WITH THE CHICKENS.
He goes to bed with the chickens (i.e. early)

ΚΑΤΙ ΤΡΕΧΕΙ ΣΤΑ ΓΥΦΤΙΚΑ.
SOMETHING’S RUNNING AT THE GYPSIES.
Big deal!

ΜΕ ΚΟΛΛΗΣΕ ΣΤΟΝ ΤΟΙΧΟ.
HE STUCK ME TO THE WALL.
He nailed me (his argument was irrefutable)

ΤΑ ΕΚΑΝΑ ΘΑΛΑΣΣΑ.
I MADE THEM OCEAN.
I made a mess of it

ΕΧΕΙ Ο ΚΑΙΡΟΣ ΓΥΡΙΣΜΑΤΑ.
HAS THE WEATHER TURNINGS.
what goes around, comes around

ΤΑ’ΧΩ ΠΑΙΞΕΙ!
I ‘VE PLAYED THEM!
I’ve had enough!

ΕΙΣΑΙ ΨΩΝΙΟ.
YOU ΑRE THE SHOPPING.
You’re a sap

ΠΟΙΟΣ ΠΛΗΡΩΝΕΙ ΤΗ ΝΥΦΗ?
WHO PAYS THE BRIDE?
Who’s paying the piper?

We need your help with these ones:

ΜΕ ΕΚΛΑΣΕ.
HE FARTED ME.

ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΞΥΡΙΖΟΥΝ ΤΟΝ ΓΑΜΠΡΟ.
AT THE END THEY SHAVE THE GROOM.

ΜΑΣ ΕΚΑΝΕ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ ΔΥΟ.
HE MADE US THE THREE TWO

ΤΗΝ ΕΚΑΝΑ ΛΑΧΕΙΟ.
I MADE HER LOTTERY.

ΕΜΕΙΝΑ ΚΟΚΑΛΟ.
I STAYED BONE.

ΕΙΔΑ ΤΟ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ ΦΑΝΤΑΡΟ.
I SAW THE CHRIST SOLDIER.

ΔΕΝ ΞΕΡΩ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ.
I DON’T KNOW CHRIST.

ΔΕΝ ΜΑΣ ΚΑΘΙΣΕ.
IT DIDN’T SIT ON US.

ΒΓΗΚΑ ΑΠΟ ΤΑ ΡΟΥΧΑ ΜΟΥ.
I CAME OUT OF MY CLOTHES.

ΕΒΡΕΞΕ ΚΑΡΕΚΛΟΠΟΔΑΡΑ.
IT RAINED CHAIR LEGS.

ΔΕΝ ΕΧΩ ΜΟΥΤΡΑ ΝΑ ΒΓΩ ΕΞΩ.
I DON’T HAVE FACES TO GO OUTSIDE.

ΔΕΝ ΞΕΡΩ ΤΗΝ ΤΥΦΛΑ ΜΟΥ.
I DON’T KNOW MY BLINDNESS.

ΤΑ’ΧΩ ΦΤΥΣΕΙ.
I HAVE SPIT THEM.

ΜΟΥ ΓΥΡΙΣΕ ΤΑ ΑΝΤΕΡΑ.
HE RETURNED ME THE ENTRAILS.

ΜΟΥ ΚΑΘΙΣΕ ΣΤΟ ΛΑΙΜΟ.
HE SAT ME ON THE NECK.

ΤΑ ΠΗΡΑ ΣΤΟ ΚΡΑΝΙΟ.
I TOOK THEM TO THE SKULL.

ΣΚΥΛΟΒΑΡΙΕΜΑΙ.
I AM DOG BORED.

ΕΚΑΝΑ ΜΑΥΡΑ ΜΑΤΙΑ ΝΑ ΣΕ ΔΩ.
I MADE BLACK EYES TO SEE YOU.

ΠΗΡΑ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ ΜΟΥ.
I TOOK MY THREE.

ΚΑΘΟΜΑΙ ΣΕ ΑΝΑΜΜΕΝΑ ΚΑΡΒΟΥΝΑ.
I’M SITTING ON IGNITED COALS.

ΣΑΝ ΤΗΝ ΑΔΙΚΗ ΚΑΤΑΡΑ.
LIKE THE UNFAIR CURSE.

ΚΟΛΟΚΥΘΙΑ ΤΟΥΜΠΑΝΑ!
MARROWS DRUMS!

ΤΟΥ ΠΟΥΣΤΗ!
OF THE GAY!

ΧΛΩΜΟ ΤΟ ΚΟΒΩ.
PALE I CUT IT.

ΚΛΑΣΕ ΜΑΣ ΜΙΑ ΜΑΝΤΡΑ!
FART US A STONEWALL !

ΑΠΟ ΕΔΩ ΠΑΝ’ΚΙ ΟΙ ΑΛΛΟΙ.
FROM HERE GO AND THE OTHERS.

ΣΚΑΤΑ ΚΑΙ ΑΠΟ ΣΚΑΤΑ.
SHIT AND FROM SHIT.

ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΚΟΝΤΗ ΓΙΟΡΤΗ.
SUNDAY SHORT FEAST.

ΧΕΣΕ ΨΗΛΑ ΚΙ ΑΓΝΑΝΤΕΥΕ.
SHIT HIGH AND GAZE.

ΣΙΓΑ ΤΑ ΛΑΧΑΝΑ.
SLOW THE CABBAGES.

ΤΗΝ ΕΚΑΝΑΝ ΑΠΟ ΧΕΡΙ.
THEY MADE HER FROM HAND.

ΝΑ ΛΕΜΕ ΤΑ ΣΥΚΑ-ΣΥΚΑ ΚΑΙ ΤΗ ΣΚΑΦΗ-ΣΚΑΦΗ.
TO SAY THE FIGS – FIGS AND THE TUB – TUB.

ΤΟ ΠΑΝΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΙΟ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΣΤΟΥ ΔΙΑΟΛΟΥ ΤΗ ΜΑΝΑ.
THE UNIVERSITY IS AT DEVIL’S MOTHER.

ΕΙΝΑΙ ΞΕΝΕΡΩΤΟ.
THIS IS DEWATERED.

ΕΓΙΝΑΝ ΡΟΜΠΕΣ-ΡΟΜΠΕΣ ΞΕΚΟΥΜΠΩΤΕΣ.
THEY BECAME ROBES – ROBES UNBUTTONED.

ΤΟΝ ΚΑΚΟ ΣΟΥ ΤΟΝ ΚΑΙΡΟ!
THE BAD YOUR WEATHER!

ΚΑΛΩΣ ΤΑ ΜΑΤΙΑ ΜΟΥ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ.
WELCOME MY EYES THE TWO.

ΟΤΙ ΘΥΜΑΣΑΙ ΧΑΙΡΕΣΑΙ.
WHATEVER YOU REMEMBER YOU ARE GLAD.

ΤOΝ ΗΠΙΑΜΕ.
WE DRANK HIM.

ΜΠΛΕΞΑΜΕ ΤΑ ΜΠΟΥΤΙΑ ΜΑΣ.
WE CONFUSED OUR THIGHS.

ΜΕ ΑΥΤΟ ΤΟ ΠΛΕΥΡΟ ΝΑ ΚΟΙΜΑΣΑΙ.
WITH THIS SIDE TO SLEEP.

ΕΓΩ ΘΑ ΒΓΑΛΩ ΤΟ ΦΙΔΙ ΑΠΟ ΤΗΝ ΤΡΥΠΑ?
WILL I TAKE OUT THE SNAKE FROM THE HOLE. ?

ΜΟΥ ΧΡΩΣΤΑΣ ΤΑ ΚΕΡΑΤΑ ΣΟΥ.
YOU OWE ME YOUR HORNS.

ΤΟ ΜΥΑΛΟ ΣΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΛΥΡΑ ΚΑΙ ΤΟΥ ΜΠΟΓΙΑΤΖΗ Ο ΚΟΠΑΝΟΣ.
YOUR MIND AND A POUND AND THE PAINTER’S BRUSH.

ΕΧΕΙΣ ΠΟΛΥ ΩΡΑΙΟ ΔΕΡΜΑ.
YOU HAVE VERY NICE LEATHER.

ΕΙΣΑΙ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΠΑΝΗΓΥΡΙΑ.
YOU ARE FOR THE FESTIVALS.

ΤΟ ΜΑΤΙ ΣΟΥ Τ’ΑΛΛΗΘΩΡΟ.
YOUR EYE THE CROSSEYED

ΥΠΟΛΟΓΙΖΕΙΣ ΧΩΡΙΣ ΤΟΝ ΞΕΝΟΔΟΧΟ.
YOU RECKON WITHOUT THE HOTEL OWNER.

ΘΑ ΦΑΣ ΞΥΛΟ.
YOU WILL EAT WOOD.

ΜΟΥ ΕΦΑΓΕΣ ΤΑ ΑΥΤΙΑ.
YOU ATE MY EARS.

l

You are for the festivals. (Είσαι για τα πανηγύρια).

Three – blanket party. (Τρικούβερτο γλέντι).

Does the goat chew taramas? (Μασάει η κατσίκα ταραμά;)

Does the cat spins in the yogurt? (Σπινάρει η γάτα στο γιαούρτι;)

Catch the egg and give it a haircut! (Πιάσε το αυγό και κούρευτο!)

My animals… slow! (Τα ζώα μου… αργά!)

Are we gluing coffee pots? (Μπρίκια κολλάμε;)

Marrow’s drums! (Κολοκύθια τούμπανα!)

Marrow’s with oregano. (Κολοκύθια με τη ρίγανη).

I made them salad! (Τα έκανα σαλάτα!)

We became robes – Robe unbuttoned! (Γίναμε ρόμπες!) – Ρόμπες ξεκούμπωτες.

I have spit them! (Τα έφτυσα!)

I throw you to the ears. (Σου ρίχνω στ’ αυτιά).

I took them to the scull! (τα πήρα στο κρανίο!)

Slow the chandelier! (σιγά τον πολυέλαιο!)

Whatever you remember you are glad! (Ό,τι θυμάσαι χαίρεσαι!)

Are you asking and the change from over?(Μου ζητάς και τα ρέστα από πάνω;)

Glass! (Τζάμι!)

We drank him. (Τον ήπιαμε).

We confused our thighs! (Μπερδέψαμε τα μπούτια μας!)

The gay’s. (Του πού…τη).

The bad your weather! (Τον κακό σου τον καιρό!)

Your eye the crosseyed! (Το μάτι σου το αλλήθωρο)!

I’ am dogbored. (Σκυλοβαριέμαι).

We did black eyes to see you. (Κάναμε μαύρα μάτια να σε δούμε).

Like the snoooows! (Σαν τα χιόνιααα!)

He made us the three two. (Μας έκανε τα τρία δύο).

I took from the three the longest. (Πήρα από τα τρία το μακρύτερο).

At the end they shave the groom. (Στο τέλος ξυρίζουν τον γαμπρό).

Sunday short feast. (Κυριακή κοντή γιορτή)

A
ARE YOU WORKING ME?
ΜΕ ΔΟΥΛΕΥΕΙΣ;

ARE WE GLUING COFFEE POTS?
ΜΠΡΙΚΙΑ ΚΟΛΛΑΜΕ;

ARE YOU ASKING AND THE CHANGE FROM OVER?
ΖΗΤΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΑ ΡΕΣΤΑ ΑΠΟ ΠΑΝΩ;

AT THE END THEY SHAVE THE GROOM.
ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΞΥΡΙΖΟΥΝ ΤΟΝ ΓΑΜΠΡΟ.

B
BETTER FIVE AND IN HAND THAN TEN AND WAITING.
ΚΑΛΛΙΟ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ ΣΤΟ ΧΕΡΙ ΠΑΡΑ ΔΕΚΑ ΚΑΙ ΚΑΡΤΕΡΕΙ.

BETTER DONKEY-BONDING THAN DONKEY-SEARCHING.
ΚΑΛΛΙΟ ΓΑΙΔΟΥΡΟΔΕΝΕ ΠΑΡΑ ΓΑΙΔΟΥΡΟΓΥΡΕΥΕ.

C
CATCH THE EGG AND MOW IT.
ΠΙΑΣΤΟ ΑΥΓΟ ΚΑΙ ΚΟΥΡΕΦΤΟ.

D
DOES THE GOAT CHOW SALTED FISH ROE???
ΜΑΣΑΕΙ Η ΚΑΤΣΙΚΑ ΤΑΡΑΜΑ;

F
FART US A STONEWALL!
ΚΛΑΣΕ ΜΑΣ ΜΙΑ ΜΑΝΤΡΑ!

FROM HERE GO AND THE OTHERS.
ΑΠΟ ΕΔΩ ΠΑΝ’ ΚΙ ΟΙ ΑΛΛΟΙ.

G
GLASS!
ΤΖΑΜΙ!

Η
HE DOESN’T UNDERSTAND CHRIST.
ΔΕΝ ΚΑΤΑΛΑΒΑΙΝΕΙ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ.

HAIRS CURLY.
ΤΡΙΧΕΣ ΚΑΤΣΑΡΕΣ.

HOW FROM HERE MORNING MORNING?
ΠΩΣ ΑΠΟ ΕΔΩ ΠΡΩΙ ΠΡΩΙ;

HE ATE DOOR.
ΕΦΑΓΕ ΠΟΡΤΑ.

HE FARTED ME.
ΜΕ ΕΚΛΑΣΕ.

HE MADE US THE THREE, TWO.
ΜΑΣ ΕΚΑΝΕ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ, ΔΥΟ.

HE SLEEPS WITH THE CHICKENS.
ΚΟΙΜΑΤΑΙ ΜΕ ΤΙΣ ΚΟΤΕΣ.

HE STUCK ME TO THE WALL.
ΜΕ ΚΟΛΛΗΣΕ ΣΤΟΝ ΤΟΙΧΟ.

HE RETURNED ME THE ENTRAILS.
ΜΟΥ ΓΥΡΙΣΕ ΤΑ ΑΝΤΕΡΑ.

HE SAT ME ON THE NECK.
ΜΟΥ ΚΑΘΙΣΕ ΣΤΟ ΛΑΙΜΟ.

HAS THE WEATHER TURNINGS.
ΕΧΕΙ Ο ΚΑΙΡΟΣ ΓΥΡΙΣΜΑΤΑ.

HE DOES THE DUCK.
ΚΑΝΕΙ ΤΗΝ ΠΑΠΙΑ.

Ι
IT SAYS!
ΛΕΕΙ!

I ‘VE PLAYED THEM!
ΤΑ ‘ΧΩ ΠΑΙΞΕΙ!

I MADE HER LOTTERY.
ΤΗΝ ΕΚΑΝΑ ΛΑΧΕΙΟ.

I STAYED BONE.
ΕΜΕΙΝΑ ΚΟΚΑΛΟ.

I SAW THE CHRIST SOLDIER.
ΕΙΔΑ ΤΟ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ ΦΑΝΤΑΡΟ.

I DON’T KNOW CHRIST.
ΔΕΝ ΞΕΡΩ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ.

IT DIDN’T SIT ON US.
ΔΕΝ ΜΑΣ ΚΑΘΙΣΕ.

I CAME OUT OF MY CLOTHES.
ΒΓΗΚΑ ΑΠΟ ΤΑ ΡΟΥΧΑ ΜΟΥ.

IT RAINED CHAIR LEGS.
ΕΒΡΕΞΕ ΚΑΡΕΚΛΟΠΟΔΑΡΑ.

I DON’T HAVE FACES TO COME OUT.
ΔΕΝ ΕΧΩ ΜΟΥΤΡΑ ΝΑ ΒΓΩ ΕΞΩ.

I DON’T KNOW MY BLINDNESS.
ΔΕΝ ΞΕΡΩ ΤΗΝ ΤΥΦΛΑ ΜΟΥ.

I MADE THEM SEA.
ΤΑ ΕΚΑΝΑ ΘΑΛΑΣΣΑ.

I HAVE SPIT THEM.
ΤΑ ‘ΧΩ ΦΤΥΣΕΙ.

I TOOK THEM TO THE SKULL.
ΤΑ ΠΗΡΑ ΣΤΟ ΚΡΑΝΙΟ.

I AM DOGBORED.
ΣΚΥΛΟΒΑΡΙΕΜΑΙ.

I MADE BLACK EYES TO SEE YOU.
ΕΚΑΝΑ ΜΑΥΡΑ ΜΑΤΙΑ ΝΑ ΣΕ ΔΩ.

I TOOK MY THREE.
ΠΗΡΑ ΤΑ ΤΡΙΑ ΜΟΥ.

I’M SITTING ON IGNITED COALS.
ΚΑΘΟΜΑΙ ΣΕ ΑΝΑΜΜΕΝΑ ΚΑΡΒΟΥΝΑ.

L
LIKE THE SNOOWS!
ΣΑΝ ΤΑ ΧΙΟΟΟΝΙΑ.

LIKE THE UNFAIR CURSE.
ΣΑΝ ΤΗΝ ΑΔΙΚΗ ΚΑΤΑΡΑ.

Μ
MARROWS DRUMS!
ΚΟΛΟΚΥΘΙΑ ΤΟΥΜΠΑΝΑ!

Ο
OF THE GAY!
ΤΟΥ ΠΟΥΣΤΗ!

P
PALE I CUT IT.
ΧΛΩΜΟ ΤΟ ΚΟΒΩ.

S
SOMETHING’S RUNNING AT THE GYPSIES.
ΚΑΤΙ ΤΡΕΧΕΙ ΣΤΑ ΓΥΦΤΙΚΑ.

SHIT AND FROMSHIT.
ΣΚΑΤΑ ΚΑΙ ΑΠΟΣΚΑΤΑ.

SUNDAY SHORT FEAST.
ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΚΟΝΤΗ ΓΙΟΡΤΗ.

SHIT HIGH AND GAZE.
ΧΕΣΕ ΨΗΛΑ ΚΙ ΑΓΝΑΝΤΕΥΕ.

SLOW THE CABBAGES.
ΣΙΓΑ ΤΑ ΛΑΧΑΝΑ.

SLOW THE MUCH OIL!
ΣΙΓΑ ΤΟΝ ΠΟΛΥΕΛΑΙΟ!

T
THEY MADE HER FROM HAND.
ΤΗΝ ΕΚΑΝΑΝ ΑΠΟ ΧΕΡΙ.

TO SAY THE FIGS-FIGS AND THE TUB-TUB.
ΝΑ ΛΕΜΕ ΤΑ ΣΥΚΑ-ΣΥΚΑ ΚΑΙ ΤΗ ΣΚΑΦΗ-ΣΚΑΦΗ.

THE UNIVERSITY IS AT DEVIL’S MOTHER.
ΤΟ ΠΑΝΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΙΟ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΣΤΟΥ ΔΙΑΟΛΟΥ ΤΗ ΜΑΝΑ.

THIS IS DEWATERED.
ΕΙΝΑΙ ΞΕΝΕΡΩΤΟ.

THEY DON’T CHEW.
ΔΕΝ ΜΑΣΑΝΕ.

THEY BECAME ROBES – ROBES UNBUTTONED.
ΕΓΙΝΑΝ ΡΟΜΠΕΣ – ΡΟΜΠΕΣ ΞΕΚΟΥΜΠΩΤΕΣ.

THE BAD YOUR WEATHER!
ΤΟΝ ΚΑΚΟ ΣΟΥ ΤΟΝ ΚΑΙΡΟ!

W
WELCOME MY EYES THE TWO.
ΚΑΛΩΣ ΤΑ ΜΑΤΙΑ ΜΟΥ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ.

WHO PAYS THE BRIDE?
ΠΟΙΟΣ ΠΛΗΡΩΝΕΙ ΤΗ ΝΥΦΗ;

WHATEVER YOU REMEMBER YOU ARE GLAD.
ΟΤΙ ΘΥΜΑΣΑΙ ΧΑΙΡΕΣΑΙ.

WE DRANK HIM.
ΤOΝ ΗΠΙΑΜΕ.

WE CONFUSED OUR THIGHS.
ΜΠΛΕΞΑΜΕ ΤΑ ΜΠΟΥΤΙΑ ΜΑΣ.

WHORE’S BANISTER.
ΤΗΣ ΠΟΥΤΑΝΑΣ ΤΟ ΚΑΓΚΕΛΟ.

WITH THIS SIDE TO SLEEP.
ΜΕ ΑΥΤΟ ΤΟ ΠΛΕΥΡΟ ΝΑ ΚΟΙΜΑΣΑΙ.

WILL I TAKE OUT THE SNAKE FROM THE HOLE?
ΕΓΩ ΘΑ ΒΓΑΛΩ ΤΟ ΦΙΔΙ ΑΠΟ ΤΗΝ ΤΡΥΠΑ;

Υ
YOU OWE ME YOUR HORNS.
ΜΟΥ ΧΡΩΣΤΑΣ ΤΑ ΚΕΡΑΤΑ ΣΟΥ.

YOUR MIND AND A POUND AND THE PAINTER’S BRUSH.
ΤΟ ΜΥΑΛΟ ΣΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΛΥΡΑ ΚΑΙ ΤΟΥ ΜΠΟΓΙΑΤΖΗ Ο ΚΟΠΑΝΟΣ.

YOU HAVE VERY NICE LEATHER.
ΕΧΕΙΣ ΠΟΛΥ ΩΡΑΙΟ ΔΕΡΜΑ.

YOU ARE FOR THE FESTIVALS.
ΕΙΣΑΙ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΠΑΝΗΓΥΡΙΑ.

YOUR EYE THE CROSSEYED.
ΤΟ ΜΑΤΙ ΣΟΥ Τ’ ΑΛΛΗΘΩΡΟ.

YOU ΑRE THE SHOPPING.
ΕΙΣΑΙ ΨΩΝΙΟ.

YOU RECKON WITHOUT THE HOTEL OWNER.
ΥΠΟΛΟΓΙΖΕΙΣ ΧΩΡΙΣ ΤΟΝ ΞΕΝΟΔΟΧΟ.

YOU WILL EAT WOOD.
ΘΑ ΦΑΣ ΞΥΛΟ.

YOU ATE MY EARS.
ΜΟΥ ΕΦΑΓΕΣ ΤΑ ΑΥΤΙΑ.

YOU WILL SEE JESUS SOLDIER
ΘΑ ΔΕΙΣ ΤΟΝ ΧΡΙΣΤΟ ΦΑΝΤΑΡΟ

He gives her to me

μου τη δινει

It happened to come to see.

εγινε το ελα να δεις

Good Wines = Καλά κρασιά

Thousand Sorry = Χίλια συγγνώμη

I took them on the skull

Τα πήρα στο κρανίο

Whore’s banister

Της πουτάνας το κάγκελο

What ever you remember you are glad

Ότι θυμάσαι χαίρεσαι

Something’s running at the gipsies

Κάτι τρέχει στα γύφτικα

We Drank Him

Τον ήπιαμε

Who pays the bride?

Ποιος πληρώνει τη νύφη;

l

So there you have it: a comprehensive list of popular Greek sayings and their complete literal English translations.

You must admit, the Greeks have some of the most original, hilarious, unique ways of expressing themselves through words. Don’t they?

So the next time you’re in a situation that calls for any of these lines to be used, think back to what you read here today, and if the timing is right, toss in a quote from the list above.

Did we miss any popular Greek expressions? Probably. Add to the discussion by throwing in a few lines of your own in the comment section below!

Malcolm Fraser joins religious leaders in urging restraint in Syria

Source: Leader

  • Former prime minister Malcolm Fraser has joined with religious leaders in urging restraint over Syria. Photo: Justin McManus JZMFormer prime minister Malcolm Fraser has joined with religious leaders in urging restraint over Syria. Photo: Justin McManus JZM
  • Julian Burnside, QC, was also one of the 34 signatories calling for restraint. Photo: Alex EllinghausenJulian Burnside, QC, was also one of the 34 signatories calling for restraint. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

A US strike against Syria could spark a world war, Australian religious and political leaders, including archbishops and former prime minister Malcolm Fraser, have said in a joint statement urging restraint.

Muslim, Jewish, Christian and Buddhist leaders plus secular leaders have signed the statement by Australians for Reconciliation in Syria saying a US strike would be “an extreme escalation” of the conflict.

“Military escalation in Syria cannot defuse the crisis, limit the casualties of war or produce peace. Instead, some believe it can lead to a world war,” the statement says.

They say it is not yet clear who launched the chemical attack in Damascus on August 21, and that in the past eight years all of the leaders of the Coalition of the Willing have conceded they entered the Iraq war based on false information.

The 34 signatories include Melbourne’s Catholic and Anglican archbishops, Denis Hart and Philip Freier, Sheikh Riad Galli, the president of the Jewish Christian Muslim Association of Australia, Coptic Bishop Suriel, Greek Orthodox Bishop Ezekiel, barrister Julian Burnside, the National and Victorian Councils of Churches, the Victorian Buddhist Council, State Labor MP Bronwyn Halfpenny and Joseph Wakim, founder of the Australian Arabic Council.

“We urge governments and the media to listen to the voices of all Syrians, particularly those who are working for a peaceful solution and who reject violence,” the statement says.

“As politicians in Australia debate whether to support the stand of President Obama on Syria, we draw attention to a comment by the Chaldean Bishop of Aleppo, the president of [Catholic aid agency] Caritas in Syria: ‘If there is an armed intervention, that would mean, I believe, a world war’.”

TV – Watch ΡΙΚSAT live streaming

 Choose one of the two links below depending on the bandwidth fo your connection to watch the satellite TV channel of CyBC, ΡΙΚSAT.

Live Streaming of ΡΙΚSAT

on adaptive bandwidth

FLASH (H.264 256-1024kbps – AAC-LC)


Live Streaming of ΡΙΚSAT

on 512kbps bandwidth

FLASH (H.264 512kbps – AAC-LC)

 

 

 

Greek News From Cyprus

3:05pm – 4:05pm, SBS 2 Qld

Tuesday, 10 September 2013

News via satellite from CyBC Cyprus, in Greek, no subtitles.

  • Genre: News
  • Country: Greece
  • Duration: 60mins

These are the world’s happiest countries including Australia

Source: News

These guys must be in a pretty happy country. Picture: Supplied

These guys must be in a pretty happy country. Picture: Supplied

IF YOU’RE seeking happiness on your next holiday, head to northern Europe.

That’s according to the 2013 World Happiness Report, which has ranked 156 countries around the world based on their joy factor.

Denmark came out on top with a rating of 7.693 out of 10, followed by Norway (7.655), Switzerland (7.650) and the Netherlands (7.512).

Australia was ranked number 10 on the list at 7.350, closely followed by Israel and Costa Rica.

Scroll down for a list of the 10 happiest countries

The survey was conducted between 2010 and 2012 for the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

It’s the second of its kind released by a team of researchers including John F. Helliwell of the University of British Columbia and Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and Richard Layard from the London School of Economics.

 

 The canal waterfront at Nyhavn, Denmark. Picture: Jenny, Stevens

The canal waterfront at Nyhavn, Denmark. Picture: Jenny, Stevens

They used data from the Gallup World Poll to rank the countries on ‘happiness’ topics including life expectancy, freedom to make life choices and social support.

It found the world has become “a slightly happier and more generous place over the past five years”. However, economic and political upheavals have impacted well being in some nations.

The countries that scored lowest in the happiness stakes were Togo, Benin, the Central African Republic, Burundi and Rwanda.

After a period of political turmoil, Egypt had the greatest fall in happiness levels, averaging 4.3 out of 10 last year, compared to 5.4 in 2007.

The authors encouraged a higher spend on mental illness, which was found to be the biggest “determinant of misery” around the world.

The top 10 happiest countries:

1. Denmark (7.693)

2. Norway (7.655)

3. Switzerland (7.650)

 

 The spires of Bern, Switzerland. Picture: Supplied

The spires of Bern, Switzerland. Picture: Supplied

4. Netherlands (7.512)

5. Sweden (7.480)

6. Canada (7.477)

7. Finland (7.389)

8. Austria (7.369)

9. Iceland (7.355)

10. Australia (7.350)

Tony Abbott waits to see if Arthur Sinodinos has retained his senate seat

Source: News

Protracted vote count could delay announcement of Tony Abbott’s ministry by weeks

Tony Abbott waits to see if Arthur Sinodinos has retained his senate seat. Picture: Cameron Richardson

Tony Abbott waits to see if Arthur Sinodinos has retained his senate seat. Picture: Cameron Richardson

AN AGONISING and protracted vote count in key election contests could see Tony Abbott’s announcement of a ministry delayed well beyond the weekend.

It could also be three weeks before it’s known whether the well-respected Liberal Arthur Sinodinos has won the sixth and final Senate slot in NSW and is ready for a frontline economic ministry role.

The worst result for the new government would be Mr Sinodinos losing to serial election loser Pauline Hanson who is attempting to revive her One Nation successes.

And the incoming Prime Minister’s close colleague Sophie Mirabella today is scrambling for votes to narrowly avoided becoming the Coalition’s most embarrassing casualty of the weekend election.

The prospective cabinet minister is relying on postal votes to fend off a challenge from local conservative independent Cathy McGowan, who was backed by a significant number of voters unhappy with Mrs Mirabella’s performance.

Ms McGowan has a small lead but Mrs Mirabella is gaining ground, eating back her rival’s advantage at the rate of about 150 votes for every postal vote counted.

 

Pauline Hanson's win would be the worst result for the new government. Picture: Calum Robertson

Pauline Hanson’s win would be the worst result for the new government. Picture: Calum Robertson

As shadow industry spokesman she was one of only two women in the shadow cabinet, the other being incoming foreign minister Julie Bishop.

Tony Abbott’s allocation of jobs will take into consideration the ambitions of another close colleague, veteran NSW MP Bronwyn Bishop.

There is speculation Mrs Bishop will be made Speaker but it also is known she wants to become a minister.

New governments usually are sworn in around eight days after polling day which means Mr Abbott would like to announce his ministry at the weekend and get on with the job officially from then.

However, even should Mrs Mirabella win her seat of Indi, hers since 2001, there would be questions about her ability to hold it while doing a cabinet job.

Her critics point to the fact that Liberal women in adjoining seats – Sussan Ley in Farrah and Sharman Stone in Murray – had swings in their favour. Mrs Mirabella had a primary vote swing against her of around seven per cent.

One hell of a start to an early summer as firestorms sweep across NSW

Source: TheTelegraph

Dramatic pictures of fire crews on the ground battling fierce fires in rural NSW.

A HOME was destroyed, seven firefighters injured and thousands of residents and school students evacuated yesterday as NSW was ravaged by 63 blazes – prompting warnings of a horror bushfire season ahead.

Just 10 days into spring, Sydney’s western suburbs, its northern fringes and the Blue Mountains were wrapped in thick smoke as firefronts raged.

 

Nutt Road Londonderry ablaze last night / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Nutt Road Londonderry ablaze last night / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Winds gusting to 70km/h fanned the flames which were sparked by record September temperatures of more than 32C – 12 degrees above the average.

The conditions were eased by a cool change which swept across the city’s west in the early evening.

 

Intense flames rage adjecent to Blacktown Road as firefighters try to contain the blaze. Picture courtesy Channel 9

Intense flames rage adjecent to Blacktown Road as firefighters try to contain the blaze. Picture courtesy Channel 9

 

Jeff Caffyn runs to protect his house in Garfield Rd Marsden Park / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Jeff Caffyn runs to protect his house in Garfield Rd Marsden Park / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Firefighters battle a blaze in Bligh Park. Picture: Rogers Phil

Firefighters battle a blaze in Bligh Park. Picture: Rogers Phil

A home was destroyed in a 10ha grassfire near Grange Ave at Marsden Park, in the western suburbs, which was being fought by 70 firefighters.

There were reports a fire truck had been destroyed as 150 crew members, using 30 appliances, battled a major grassfire at Castlereagh and Londonderry on the city’s northern borders.

More than 3000 homes in the Richmond and Londonderry areas lost electricity as a result of the fires.

There were also reports a fish farm had been destroyed at South Windsor.

RFS Deputy Commissioner Rob Rogers said having so many fires in such a concentrated area around Sydney’s greater west was a challenge.

 

Picture: Stephen Cooper

Picture: Stephen Cooper

A children's cubby house and play set are choked by smoke in Bligh Park. Picture: Rogers Phil

A children’s cubby house and play set are choked by smoke in Bligh Park. Picture: Phil Rogers

Large fires also burned at Cessnock, Wyong, Bathurst, the Snowy Mountains, the Bega Valley on the south coast and the Clarence Valley on the north coast.

In Winmalee, in the Blue Mountains, some residents rushed to pack belongings while others brought out deck chairs to watch the clouds of smoke.

Police went door-to-door and the RFS told residents to evacuate as the fire erupted late yesterday morning.

There are fears yesterday’s infernos are a sign of things to come after an unseasonably dry winter.

 

Sue Marshal in Marsden Park off Garfield Rd / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Sue Marshal in Marsden Park off Garfield Rd / Picture: Stephen Cooper

 

 Concerned residents fear for their properties in Londonderry as the fires move closer.

Concerned residents fear for their properties in Londonderry as the fires move closer.

 

 The bushfire Bligh Park / Picture: Dwayne Elix

The bushfire Bligh Park / Picture: Dwayne Elix

NSW Fire Commissioner Greg Mullins, Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons and Police and Emergency Services minister Mike Gallacher last night visited crews in the Blue Mountains.

Mr Mullins said: “We hope this is not a portent of things to come.”

He said a wind change was sending the fire toward Hawkesbury Heights.

“It is a big body of fire that is going to take days to bring under control,”RFS Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said: “This is not good news for the next three months and is not a good sign for summer.

“The fact we have had the hottest start ever to spring is a big concern.

“We have a situation where a lot of the vegetation is already dry and if you add continuing dry weather, then days of hot weather with strong winds and you have a very worrying situation.”

“Today should serve as a wake-up call to everyone – you must be prepared for bushfires before they are on your doorstep.”

 

View of Londonderry fires from Bowen Mountain. Picture: Duncan Media

View of Londonderry fires from Bowen Mountain. Picture: Duncan Media

 

Fire burns out of control in the Windsor Downs Nature Reserve.

Fire burns out of control in the Windsor Downs Nature Reserve.

 

A large bushfire moves into Londonderry.

A large bushfire moves into Londonderry.

Walter Markowski, 67, lives on Devlin Rd, Castlereagh, and spotted the flames about 1km from his property.

“I got an old tank of water from the roof and started putting out spot fires,” he said. “The wind was changing quite rapidly. It was a whirlwind going back and forward.

“I put a spot fire out from the roof of my work shed. My home is all right.

“The wind was like a tornado and it kept changing the fire all the time.”

Neighbour Jason Laurence rounded up his racing dogs as the fire approached.

“I have 12 dogs and I had to decide which ones to save. Luckily my mate came around with an eight-dog trailer and put eight in the trailer and four in my car and got out of there,” he said.

 

A man waters down his roof in Windsor Downs / Picture: Stephen Cooper

A man waters down his roof in Windsor Downs / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Devlin St Londonderry / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Devlin St Londonderry / Picture: Stephen Cooper

Bushfire at Marsden Park, home under threat.

A bushfire burns out of control at Marsden Park

Bush fire in the Bligh Park area. Pic: Phil Rogers

Bushfire in the Bligh Park area. Picture: Phil Rogers

 

Bushfire at Marsden Park.

Bushfire at Marsden Park.

Fire pic from Twitter. Tweeted by Journo Lizzie Pearl of the Castlereagh bush fire

Fire picture from tweeted by journalist Lizzie Pearl at Castlereagh

An fish farm is destroyed by a new bushfire at South Windsor.

A fish farm is destroyed by fire at South Windsor

Aerial pics from Channel 9 of the Castlereagh bush fire.

Aerial pictures courtesy of Channel 9 above Castlereagh

Bush fire in the Bligh Park area / Picture: Phil Rogers

Bush fire in the Bligh Park area / Picture: Phil Rogers

Premier Barry O’Farrell told parliament yesterday that at one point there were 59 bush and grass fires blazing in NSW, 40 of them uncontained.

Mr O’Farrell said more than 500 firefighters and 200 appliances are responding to the fires across NSW. Two aircraft dropped water at Winmalee and another two were doing their vital work at Castlereagh yesterday.

At Londonderry, where students from the public school were evacuated to the Penrith regatta centre, anxious residents were told to leave their homes. Some huddled at a petrol station as they waited to hear if their properties were safe.

The smell of bushfire smoke was wafting across Sydney’s CBD.

Yashmin Narsamma said: “The coppers are at the front gates evacuating everybody. I’ve got horses, dogs, cats, kids in there.

Sonia Kovacek added: “I wanted to stay, I wanted to protect my cows.

Resident Kate Alexander opted to remain at her home. The farm owner did not know if her cattle, horse and sheep were safe. Ms Kovacek said a bushfire threatened a similar area three years ago and called for more back burning over the winter.

 

Burnt out shed in Castlereagh. Grass fire is coming closer to homes near Devlin Road. Pic: Channel 9

A burnt out shed in Castlereagh. A grass fire is stalking homes near Devlin Road. Pic: Channel 9

 

Aerial pics from Channel 9 of the Castlereagh bushfire

Aerial pictures courtesy of Channel 9 above the Castlereagh blaze

Castlereagh Fire Pics from Channel 7 Chopper.

Pictures of the Castlereagh fire from the Channel 7 news chopper

Transcript: Obama’s address on Syria

Source: CNN

President Barack Obama speaks about Syria in a televised address on Sept. 10, 2013.

President Barack Obama speaks about Syria in a televised address on Sept. 10, 2013

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/politics/2013/09/11/sot-obama-nation-address-u-s-strike-on-syria.cnn.html

Targeted military strikes against Syria would deter Syria’s government from using chemical weapons and make clear to the world that the use of such weapons won’t be tolerated, President Barack Obama said Tuesday night in a televised address to the American public.

He also pointed to “encouraging signs” in diplomatic efforts to address the crisis, crediting these “in part because of the credible threat of U.S. military action.” But if diplomacy fails, the U.S. and its military will “be in position to respond,” Obama said, not ruling out military intervention in the war-torn country.

Read a transcript of his remarks below.

My fellow Americans, tonight I want to talk to you about Syria, why it matters and where we go from here. Over the past two years, what began as a series of peaceful protests against the oppressive regime of Bashar al-Assad has turned into a brutal civil war.

Over 100,000 people have been killed. Millions have fled the country. In that time, America’s worked with allies to provide humanitarian support, to help the moderate opposition, and to shape a political settlement, but I have resisted calls for military action because we cannot resolve someone else’s civil war through force, particularly after a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The situation profoundly changed, though, on August 21st, when Assad’s government gassed to death over 1,000 people, including hundreds of children. The images from this massacre are sickening: men, women, children lying in rows, killed by poison gas, others foaming at the mouth, gasping for breath, a father clutching his dead children, imploring them to get up and walk.

On that terrible night, the world saw in gruesome detail the terrible nature of chemical weapons and why the overwhelming majority of humanity has declared them off-limits, a crime against humanity and a violation of the laws of war.

This was not always the case. In World War I, American G.I.s were among the many thousands killed by deadly gas in the trenches of Europe. In World War II, the Nazis used gas to inflict the horror of the Holocaust. Because these weapons can kill on a mass scale, with no distinction between soldier and infant, the civilized world has spent a century working to ban them. And in 1997, the United States Senate overwhelmingly approved an international agreement prohibiting the use of chemical weapons, now joined by 189 governments that represent 98 percent of humanity.

On August 21st, these basic rules were violated, along with our sense of common humanity. No one disputes that chemical weapons were used in Syria. The world saw thousands of videos, cell phone pictures, and social media accounts from the attack, and humanitarian organizations told stories of hospitals packed with people who had symptoms of poison gas.

Moreover, we know the Assad regime was responsible. In the days leading up to August 21st, we know that Assad’s chemical weapons personnel prepared for an attack near an area where they mix sarin
gas. They distributed gas masks to their troops. Then they fired rockets from a regime-controlled area into 11 neighborhoods that the regime has been trying to wipe clear of opposition forces. Shortly after those rockets landed, the gas spread, and hospitals filled with the dying and the wounded.

We know senior figures in Assad’s military machine reviewed the results of the attack and the regime increased their shelling of the same neighborhoods in the days that followed. We’ve also studied samples of blood and hair from people at the site that tested positive for sarin.

When dictators commit atrocities, they depend upon the world to look the other way until those horrifying pictures fade from memory, but these things happened. The facts cannot be denied.

The question now is what the United States of America and the international community is prepared to do about it, because what happened to those people — to those children — is not only a violation of international law, it’s also a danger to our security. Let me explain why.

If we fail to act, the Assad regime will see no reason to stop using chemical weapons. As the ban against these weapons erodes, other tyrants will have no reason to think twice about acquiring poison gas and using them. Over time, our troops would again face the prospect of chemical warfare on the battlefield, and it could be easier for terrorist organizations to obtain these weapons and to use them to attack civilians.

If fighting spills beyond Syria’s borders, these weapons could threaten allies like Turkey, Jordan and Israel. And a failure to stand against the use of chemical weapons would weaken prohibitions against other weapons of mass destruction and embolden Assad’s ally, Iran, which must decide whether to ignore international law by building a nuclear weapon or to take a more peaceful path.

This is not a world we should accept. This is what’s at stake. And that is why, after careful deliberation, I determined that it is in the national security interests of the United States to respond to the Assad regime’s use of chemical weapons through a targeted military strike. The purpose of this strike would be to deter Assad from using chemical weapons, to degrade his regime’s ability to use them, and to make clear to the world that we will not tolerate their use.

That’s my judgment as commander-in-chief, but I’m also the president of the world’s oldest constitutional democracy. So even though I possess the authority to order military strikes, I believed it was right in the absence of a direct or imminent threat to our security to take this debate to Congress. I believe our democracy is stronger when the president acts with the support of Congress, and I believe that America acts more effectively abroad when we stand together. This is especially true after a decade that put more and more war-making power in the hands of the president and more and more burdens on the shoulders of our troops, while sidelining the people’s representatives from the critical decisions about when we use force.

Now, I know that after the terrible toll of Iraq and Afghanistan, the idea of any military action — no matter how limited — is not going to be popular. After all, I’ve spent four-and-a-half years working to end wars, not to start them.

Our troops are out of Iraq. Our troops are coming home from Afghanistan. And I know Americans want all of us in Washington –especially me — to concentrate on the task of building our nation here at home, putting people back to work, educating our kids, growing our middle class. It’s no wonder then that you’re asking hard questions.

So let me answer some of the most important questions that I’ve heard from members of Congress and that I’ve read in letters that you’ve sent to me. First, many of you have asked, won’t this put us on a slippery slope to another war? One man wrote to me that we are still recovering from our involvement in Iraq. A veteran put it more bluntly: This nation is sick and tired of war.

My answer is simple. I will not put American boots on the ground in Syria. I will not pursue an open-ended action like Iraq or Afghanistan. I will not pursue a prolonged air campaign like Libya or Kosovo. This would be a targeted strike to achieve a clear objective, deterring the use of chemical weapons and degrading Assad’s capabilities.

Others have asked whether it’s worth acting if we don’t take out Assad. Now, some members of Congress have said there’s no point in simply doing a pinprick strike in Syria.

Let me make something clear: The United States military doesn’t do pinpricks. Even a limited strike will send a message to Assad that no other nation can deliver.

I don’t think we should remove another dictator with force. We learned from Iraq that doing so makes us responsible for all that comes next. But a targeted strike can makes Assad — or any other dictator — think twice before using chemical weapons.

Other questions involve the dangers of retaliation. We don’t dismiss any threats, but the Assad regime does not have the ability to seriously threaten our military. Any other — any other retaliation they might seek is in line with threats that we face every day. Neither Assad nor his allies have any interest in escalation that would lead to his demise, and our ally, Israel, can defend itself with overwhelming force, as well as the unshakable support of the United States of America.

Many of you have asked a broader question: Why should we get involved at all in a place that’s so complicated and where, as one person wrote to me, those who come after Assad may be enemies of human rights?
It’s true that some of Assad’s opponents are extremists. But al Qaida will only draw strength in a more chaotic Syria if people there see the world doing nothing to prevent innocent civilians from being gassed to death.

The majority of the Syrian people, and the Syrian opposition we work with, just want to live in peace, with dignity and freedom. And the day after any military action, we would redouble our efforts to achieve a political solution that strengthens those who reject the forces of tyranny and extremism.

Finally, many of you have asked, why not leave this to other countries or seek solutions short of force? As several people wrote to me, we should not be the world’s policemen.

I agree. And I have a deeply held preference for peaceful solutions. Over the last two years, my administration has tried diplomacy and sanctions, warnings and negotiations, but chemical weapons were still used by the Assad regime.

However, over the last few days, we’ve seen some encouraging signs, in part because of the credible threat of U.S. military action, as well as constructive talks that I had with President Putin. The Russian government has indicated a willingness to join with the international community in pushing Assad to give up his chemical weapons. The Assad regime has now admitting that it has these weapons and even said they’d join the Chemical Weapons Convention, which prohibits their use.

It’s too early to tell whether this offer will succeed, and any agreement must verify that the Assad regime keeps its commitments, but this initiative has the potential to remove the threat of chemical weapons without the use of force, particularly because Russia is one of Assad’s strongest allies.

I have therefore asked the leaders of Congress to postpone a vote to authorize the use of force while we pursue this diplomatic path. I’m sending Secretary of State John Kerry to meet his Russian counterpart on Thursday, and I will continue my own discussions with President Putin.

I’ve spoken to the leaders of two of our closest allies – France and the United Kingdom — and we will work together in consultation with Russia and China to put forward a resolution at the U.N. Security Council requiring Assad to give up his chemical weapons and to ultimately destroy them under international control.

We’ll also give U.N. inspectors the opportunity to report their findings about what happened on August 21st, and we will continue to rally support from allies from Europe to the Americas, from Asia to the Middle East, who agree on the need for action.

Meanwhile, I’ve ordered our military to maintain their current posture to keep the pressure on Assad and to be in a position to respond if diplomacy fails. And tonight I give thanks, again, to our military and their families for their incredible strength and sacrifices.

My fellow Americans, for nearly seven decades, the United States has been the anchor of global security. This has meant doing more than forging international agreements; it has meant enforcing them. The burdens of leadership are often heavy, but the world’s a better place because we have borne them.

And so to my friends on the right, I ask you to reconcile your commitment to America’s military might with the failure to act when a cause is so plainly just.

To my friends on the left, I ask you to reconcile your belief in freedom and dignity for all people with those images of children writhing in pain and going still on a cold hospital floor, for sometimes resolutions and statements of condemnation are simply not enough.

Indeed, I’d ask every member of Congress and those of you watching at home tonight to view those videos of the attack, and then ask, what kind of world will we live in if the United States of
America sees a dictator brazenly violate international law with poison gas and we choose to look the other way?

Franklin Roosevelt once said, “Our national determination to keep free of foreign wars and foreign entanglements cannot prevent us from feeling deep concern when ideas and principles that we have cherished are challenged.”

Our ideals and principles, as well as our national security, are at stake in Syria, along with our leadership of a world where we seek to ensure that the worst weapons will never be used.

America is not the world’s policeman. Terrible things happen across the globe, and it is beyond our means to right every wrong, but when with modest effort and risk we can stop children from being gassed to death and thereby make our own children safer over the long run, I believe we should act.

That’s what makes America different. That’s what makes us exceptional. With humility, but with resolve, let us never lose sight of that essential truth.

Thank you, God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.

Greece: Suicide Has Soared During Crisis, Aid Group Says

Source: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Suicides increased by 45 percent during the first four years of Greece’s financial crisis, a mental health aid group said Tuesday, warning that there were indications of a further “very large rise” in the past two years.

The Athens-based group Klimaka said officially reported suicides rose steadily, accounting for a jump in deaths to 477 in 2011 from 328 in 2007, according to data from the Greek Statistical Authority.

The group said, based on its own research, the number of suicides had continued to rise through 2012 and 2013.